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There’s something about the lingering aroma of roasted garlic before eating a meal. Garlic improves numerous health conditions. From an improved immune system to heart disease protection, garlic is an herb worth adding weekly recipes. However, due to its intense flavor profile, many people ignore garlic’s benefits. 

Luckily, roasted garlic has a milder taste and still delivers health benefits. For people looking for ways to eat more roasted garlic, here’s a list of recipe suggestions.

 Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes 

Everyone loves mashed potatoes. They’re creamy and make the perfect side dish for any protein. In addition to using traditional seasonings, tossing in some roasted garlic provides an extra layer of flavor. Best of all, kids love mashed potatoes, so they’ll be able to enjoy a healthier version of one of their favorite meals.

 Homemade Roasted Garlic Bread 

Garlic bread and pasta go together like Batman and Robin. Incorporating roasted garlic kicks this bread recipe up a notch by adding smokiness. It’s as simple as adding roasted garlic to the bread and topping it with olive oil or blending the roasted garlic into the butter before application. 

 Roasted Garlic and Veggie Pizza 

Another easy way to get the entire family to eat roasted garlic is as a pizza topping. The beauty of making pizza is most herbs and veggies easily compliment each other. In addition to being delicious, it’s a healthy alternative to processed meat pizzas. For instance, using onions, olives, bell peppers, and roasted garlic as pizza toppings provide a serving of vegetables that even the kids want to eat. If not, blending roasted garlic into homemade pizza sauce helps disguise this healthy herb.

Anyone who knows how to work an oven can make roasted garlic. Besides being healthy, adding roasted garlic to dishes that typically call for raw garlic adds a boost of flavor once it caramelizes. Depending on the recipe, even picky eaters won’t be able to tell the difference. 

After making roasted garlic, be sure to store the leftover cloves in the fridge or the freezer within an hour. Otherwise, they’re vulnerable to harmful toxin growth.